Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

Exxon Corporation International

Chad-Cameroon Pipeline

Scope

  • Feasiblity Study
  • Preliminary Engineering
  • Infrastructure Survey
  • Logistics Plan
  • EPC Bid Packages


Facilities

  • 1,041 km, 30-inch diameter onshore pipeline
  • 11 km, 30-inch offshore pipeline and a floating storage and off loading (FSO) vessel.
  • Four, 12,000 hp pumping stations
  • One pressure reducing station

Gulf performed preliminary engineering services for one of largest heated oil pipeline system in the world. Competitively selected by Exxon Company International in 1993, this work involved a thorough analysis of multiple scenarios for the design, construction and operation of the first major hydrocarbon export system in either of these two Central African countries.

The scope of work consisted of selecting the pipeline route; locating the pump stations and the offshore export facilities; performing sensitivity analyses for pipeline diameter, pumping horsepower, heating capacity storage volumes, and operating pressure; analyzing and recommending improvement to the existing infrastructure of both counties; performing in-country surveys and reconnaissance; preparing definitive project cost estimates and schedules; preparing technical specifications for equipment, materials and construction; preparing onshore and offshore pipeline alignment sheets, pump station plot plans, flow diagrams and P&IDs; and preparing the Design Basis documents for these facilities.

The system selected at the conclusion of work in 1995 was a 30-inch diameter onshore pipeline, 1,041 kilometers in length, with four, 12,000 hp (nominal installed) pump stations (three with direct-fired crude oil heaters), one pressure reducing station, a 11 kilometer, 30-inch offshore pipeline, and a floating storage and offloading (FSO) vessel. The design flowrate for the system was 250,000 BPD. Special challenges presented during the project consisted of such problems as the limited transportation systems in both countries, the monsoon-restricted construction season, optimum heating of the crude oil, environmental sensitivity of the tropical rain forests, lack of trained labor force in either country, and heavy crude burning engine availability.

Additional information